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Here's What's Happening EVERY HOUR You Put Off Registering Your Trademark [AUDIO]




Here's what's happening EVERY HOUR you put off registering your trademark. It's not pretty. Watch. Learn. Then, reach out to us at choosetma.com to start protecting your brand today.





#GreatBrands start here. You have a name you’ve been using to promote a business, product, or influence. Maybe it’s a name you’re thinking of using but haven’t yet. At the end of the day, you must protect that name. How? By obtaining a trademark certificate that validates your ownership and rights in your brand.


A trademark certificate is often the fastest way to prevent or stop an overzealous competitor from trying to benefit from the brand goodwill you’ve taken the time [and resources] to build. It’s also a No. 1 way to demand higher compensation when you do brand collaborations because that paperwork = brand credibility. Don’t wait, #brandbuilders. Take care of the legal necessities now so you don’t have to get ready when opportunity (or infringers) knock. Payment arrangements available. No excuses. Visit choosetma.com and click “Pricing” for details.





If you filed your trademark application yourself but now the USPTO has issued an Office Action refusing to register your mark, let tmalaw help you navigate the minefields to secure registration.


Non-Substantive Office Actions


Non-substantive trademark Office Actions are letters issued by USPTO examining attorneys that do not necessarily refuse registration of the mark. They generally cover formalities that may be resolved quickly and inexpensively. For example, any of the following reasons may lead to a non-substantive Office Action:


  • proposed amendment to the identification or classification of goods/services

  • request for more information on the mark

  • proposed revision to the description of a stylized design mark

  • requested disclaimer of a portion of the trademark


Substantive Office Actions


Substantive trademark Office Actions typically include a refusal to register the trademark based on certain grounds. They generally raise issues requiring more time and greater effort in response. For example, any of the following reasons may lead to a substantive Office Action:


  • likelihood of confusion refusal

  • mere descriptiveness refusal

  • disagreement with a disclaimer required by the examining attorney